Is This Exclusive Use?

Is This Exclusive Use?

Dear Mr. Richardson, If a club in the HOA wants a locked storage space, is it considered exclusive use? W.S., Escondido Dear W.S., Exclusive use common area is defined by Civil Code Section 4145 as a portion of common area dedicated by the CC&R’s to the use of a single owner or group of owners. So, the club storage space, unless it was mentioned in the CC&R’s, would ordinarily not be considered exclusive use, but is common area allocated by board permission. Thanks, Kelly Kelly, I have a problem with my HOA on who pays for plumbing backing up due to a rusty pipe outside my unit in the front. The pipe rusted out and backed up into my unit. The HOA says it’s my responsibility because the pipe is “exclusively” into my unit therefore I have to replace the pipe and fix my flooring at my expense. Any advice would be appreciated. D.W., Fair Oaks Dear D.W., Do the CC&R’s of your HOA designate pipes which only serve your unit to be “exclusive use common area?” Per the Dover Village v. Jennison appellate decision of 2010, unless the CC&R’s say otherwise, the pipes outside a unit are not considered exclusive use common area. Even if they are considered exclusive use, do the CC&R’s specifically say that repair of the pipes is your responsibility? Civil Code 4775(a)(3) states that, unless the CC&R’s say otherwise, exclusive use common areas are to be repaired by the HOA and maintained by the homeowner. In townhouse-style condominiums, in which much of the plumbing separately serves individual units, associations sometimes amend the CC&R’s to...
Can We Limit Dogs?

Can We Limit Dogs?

Hi Kelly,  Our HOA recently voted to update our CC&R’s. One section prohibits ownership of numerous breeds of dogs that the board considers dangerous. Since California law (Food and Agri. Code 31683) outlaws dog breed discrimination by counties and cities we are the only HOA in the region that bans ownership of certain dogs. Isn’t it illegal under Davis-Stirling to violate state law?  R.L., Rancho Santa Fe  Dear R.L., The Food and Agricultural Code section you mention applies to ordinances adopted by cities and counties, but not restrictions passed by common interest developments. So, when the association members voted to approve an amendment to the CC&R’s prohibiting certain dog breeds, the amendment would not violate that specific law. However, the Davis-Stirling Act does protect the right to have a “pet,” which per Civil Code 4715 includes dogs. Under that statute, an association must allow an owner to keep one pet on the property. The statute defines “pet” as including ”any…dog,” so if one takes the statute as written, it is the homeowner who chooses what breed of dog to have, not the HOA. Thanks for your question, Kelly Dear Mr. Richardson, How can HOAs handle large, aggressive service dogs that otherwise would be barred by CC&R’s? How can HOAs accommodate residents’ allergies or legitimate fears re: service animals? A.Y., West Los Angeles Dear A.Y., The Fair Housing Act requires associations to provide reasonable accommodations to residents with disabilities, and one of the most common accommodations allowing a service dog or support animal. However, if the dog creates a nuisance by damaging property or menacing other residents, that accommodation may...
Two Homeowners Want Out, One Wants In

Two Homeowners Want Out, One Wants In

Dear Kelly, Is there a way to get out of our three member HOA? Our home stands alone. The other two are connected. Thank you for your comment on this! K.N., Santa Barbara Dear K.N., I assume your association was established as a condominium project. Most likely the developer wanted to put more homes on the land than the zoning and Subdivision Map Act would allow. Condominiums are often a way to place more homes in a smaller space. Small associations are often pinched between the increasingly complex and burdensome Davis-Stirling Act and the cost of hiring professional management and legal counsel to navigate the Act. Most very small associations operate largely in disregard of the Act, typically more like a partnership than an association. If the three properties cannot meet the requirements of separate independent lots, it may be impossible to disband the association. It would certainly take agreement of all three owners and each of their mortgage lenders to make that change. Check with a real estate attorney in your area to find out if this is possible. Best, Kelly Dear Mr. Richardson, How can I resign from the HOA as an owner? J.K., Anaheim Dear J.K., A common interest development (aka “homeowners association”) automatically is joined when one becomes an owner in that development. That happens by virtue of the recorded covenants on the property which “run with the land” and are a contract binding the owner even though the owner never signed it. To exit the contract one must cease to own the land on which the CC&R’s are recorded, meaning the only way to...
Matt Ober & Kelly Richardson Team Up with Beven & Brock

Matt Ober & Kelly Richardson Team Up with Beven & Brock

On October 9th, Matt D. Ober, Esq. will join fellow College of Community Association Lawyers (CCAL) member, Brian Moreno, Esq. of the Swedelson Gottlieb law firm to present, an HOA Board Seminar titled, “CURRENT HOT LEGAL ISSUES” for Beven & Brock clients. Topics to include: Solar, Elections, Who Is Responsible for Maintenance, Harassment & Bullying, Collections and Amending/Rewriting CC&Rs. SAVE THE DATE Then, on October 23rd, Kelly G. Richardson, Esq., CCAL will lead Beven & Brock’s clients in a HOA BOARD MEMBER EDUCATION seminar. Education for volunteer HOA board members is essential for success as board members. Due to the ever-increasing complex and changing nature of the laws and regulations that impact common-interest-developments staying on top of these changes greatly increases a board’s member ability to succeed in their role, and operate in confidence.   From Beven & Brock Here is how to register: CALL: (626) 795-3282, ext. 886 EMAIL: HOASeminars@bevenandbrock.com Provide your name, your email, the name of your HOA and the number of guests you are...
A Proactive Approach to Controlling Short-Term Rentals in Your Community

A Proactive Approach to Controlling Short-Term Rentals in Your Community

Whether through the Courts, the Legislature or human nature, from drought restrictions to email prohibitions, community associations are often forced to adapt quickly to change in order to govern effectively. In the case of the short-term rental craze, this change seems harder to tackle. Indeed, the short-term rental market is having an increasing impact on community associations. Residents often complain that short-term renters – who are transient by definition – do not treat association common areas with the same regard as resident owners. Most are unaware of association rules and contribute to mounting security, trash removal, parking, and noise related concerns, not to mention the increased common area expenses that come with the increased burden of handling short-term renters. On an emotional level, residents are often uncomfortable with the fact that their neighborhoods are filled with unfamiliar faces, many of whom are on-site for only a few days at a time. The idea of transient rentals in our communities seems at odds with the objective of maintaining the residential character of our neighborhoods. We all have seen provisions in our communities’ documents that prohibit “non-residential” use of a unit, or that restrict use of property for “private single-family residential purposes.” While many associations have adjusted to an increase in tenant occupied residences in their communities, this “business” use of a residence, where unfamiliar groups of people share the common area and facilities for brief periods of time, never to be seen again, is incompatible with everything we’ve come to know and understand about community associations. The short-term use of a residence only adds to the resentment towards tenants who...