What Makes a Director Outstanding [Part 4] – Participation in Board Meetings

What Makes a Director Outstanding [Part 4] – Participation in Board Meetings

Productive and efficient meetings are not happenstance but are the result of committed and prepared volunteers, normally assisted by a great professional manager. To help bring about the best board meetings: Read the agenda packet Come to the meeting prepared, having already read the agenda and the supporting materials. The packet is provided in advance to prepare you to make the decisions presented. Reading it for the first time at the meeting disrespects the other directors, indicates lack of commitment, and delays meetings as one “gets up to speed.” Stay on topic A single director can derail discussions by moving on to a different topic before the current one is concluded. Politely remind colleagues when deliberations stray from the matter at hand. Talk to the board, not the audience Directors attend board meeting to deliberate with board colleagues, not the audience. Grandstanding by speaking to the audience disrespects other directors and encourages raucous meetings. Ask the manager for input on most motions The board’s most frequent protector under the Business Judgment Rule is the manager, so seek the manager’s input. The manager often has years of experience and training; take advantage of that background. If a manager’s input isn’t being sought, why have them in the meeting? Treat open forum as an important event and pay attention California law requires open forum at all membership meetings and open board meetings. That is the time for the board to listen to the community. Take notes and don’t interject or argue. Open forum reminds directors that they are there to serve their community, and often helps the board learn things they...
What Makes a Director Outstanding [Part 3] – Understanding How The Role Is DIFFERENT

What Makes a Director Outstanding [Part 3] – Understanding How The Role Is DIFFERENT

All the knowledge and experience from the working world (“day job”) can actually hinder a volunteer’s effectiveness in the world of HOA governance if the differences between the two worlds are not understood. Outstanding directors have learned that much of what worked for them in their day job will likely work poorly in the context of board governance. The chain of command is completely different in a community association. In the workplace, there is usually a person who is the “big boss”, somebody who is your immediate supervisor, and someone who you supervise. In the association, no single person is in charge. Decisions are made by the board, so the chain of command is horizontal and not hierarchical. The president in a common interest development is not the “big boss.” The president has far less power in most nonprofit corporations since all important decisions are made by the board, and so the president’s vote is no more important than any other. In this very different paradigm, the individual director typically has no personal power. Once directors embrace the framework of the board as decision-maker, they understand that they cannot make individual promises. This restraint can be very freeing since no individual is responsible for the association and its actions, as all decisions is made by board vote. So, when confronted at the pool or parking garage by homeowners demanding action, the director can truly say they can’t individually do anything and suggest the homeowner bring their concern to management or to a board meeting. Directors failing to adapt to the group decision-making process will often stray outside of corporate...