Should Our Assessments Increase?

Should Our Assessments Increase?

Hello Mr. Richardson, Our board is against raising our fees which have been the same for at least 10 years! Obviously we are not keeping up with inflation. According to our reserve study we are over $1000 per unit underfunded. We have [decades old] buildings. My concerns are falling on deaf ears despite the encouragement of our management company to raise fees. I would deeply appreciate your opinion. J.E., Irvine Dear J.E., Association boards are responsible to budget and spend association funds wisely. If a board decides in advance that it will not increase the budget, it is quite likely such a board has placed as its first priority the artificial preservation of assessments and that the upkeep of the property (and the association’s long-term financial health) is a lower priority. Properly caring for the common property and keeping vendor expenses flat for over ten years is unbelievable (and not in a good way). Because of the fact of inflation, cost increases should be factored into the healthy HOA budget. Otherwise, the association is probably deferring maintenance, hiring cheap (instead of the most competent and appropriate) vendors, and is not properly funding its reserve account. Such association are not financially healthy and are akin to people who live on credit cards. Such an association eventually has to face a day of unhappy reckoning when the deferred bills all come due and the association is forced to borrow. Qualified and certified managers are trained to prepare budgets and should be heeded in this regard. Maintaining property, keeping up with inflation, and depositing faithfully in reserves are all actions preserving the...
Recording Meetings, Secret Budget Talks, and a Dictator President

Recording Meetings, Secret Budget Talks, and a Dictator President

Hello Mr. Richardson, Our board announced that audio recordings of meetings would no longer be allowed. What are your thoughts on this? Does this action by the board violate the Brown Act, the Davis-Stirling or some other statute? Thank you, N.D., Rancho Santa Fe Dear N.D., As private organizations, common interest development associations (aka “HOAs”) are not controlled by the Brown Act (which applies to public bodies). The Davis-Stirling Act contains the “Open Meeting Act,” found at Civil Code 4900-4955. The Open Meeting Act does not require that HOA meetings be recorded electronically, but only that draft minutes of meetings be available no later than 30 days after the meeting. I generally recommend against audio or video recording of board proceedings, except in the rare occasion the association has the proper facilities to record and broadcast meetings (typically only in very large HOAs). Recording meetings often creates two negative problems – it intimidates some, and invites others to grandstand. So long as the policy is clearly stated, association boards can take either policy direction. Best, Kelly To Kelly G. Richardson, We have a question concerning our HOA president. The president is running a construction company that controls all maintenance and repairs throughout the community. She runs the community as a dictatorship and no one on the board is allowed to even speak. We have requested financial records – it won’t work. She told us this could no longer be discussed. M.L., Lake Forest Dear M.L., Some HOA presidents simply let the position get to their head. HOA presidents have very little power in most HOAs, aside from calling and chairing meetings. They have...

New Year’s Resolutions [Part 2] – The HOA Member

I, the HOA member, resolve to: Number one: Follow the Golden Rule: treat others as you would like to be treated. My attitude: Not refer to the HOA or board as “they,” since it is all “us.” The directors are also members who pay assessments and give their time to benefit us all. Be neighborly, because shared ownership fails without cooperation. Assume our directors are doing their best as volunteers, and give them the benefit of the doubt. Not first assume the board is incompetent or dishonest when I believe it is overspending. Avoid the “my home, my castle” attitude. We share the benefits of common interest ownership, which means we also agree to share the control of our property. Ask questions before making statements, criticizing, or even accusing. Acknowledge the board may have more information than me. This doesn’t mean the board is right, but it does mean my opinion might not be fully informed. Take the long view of our association property, supporting growth of our capital reserves fund and maintaining our buildings. Be knowledgeable: Read the information the HOA sends to me. Be familiar with the CC&R’s, bylaws, and rules. I will reduce confusion and disputes by understanding the use restrictions and rules. Read the association budget and reserve study. I will ask informed questions, particularly about deviations from budget. If I ask to review financial documents, I will not ask for “everything,” and request only documents which I really need, acknowledging my manager is not a librarian. Help board meetings: Insist the board follow the Open Meeting Act, and only handle in closed session the...