Investing, Growing, and Withdrawing Reserve Funds

Investing, Growing, and Withdrawing Reserve Funds

Kelly, I am a member of my HOA board. Our prior management company had done all of our investments (from our direction) for our reserve funds. FDIC insured CD’s were used as we understood that they were required by California law only to invest our funds in FDIC insured funds. We saw that the interest rate income from FDIC insured funds did not cover inflation increases and considered utilizing a financial firm to assist us to find some other opportunities that better protected our reserve assets using a combination of FDIC and SIPC insured securities. We have had some questioning from homeowners if it legal for us to utilize an SIPC insured fund (versus an FDIC fund). What type of investment opportunities are legal for HOA reserve funds? Thank you, C.W., Oceanside Dear C.W., As a fiduciary of the association funds, the board must keep the members’ money secure and not subject to reduction. In the world of financial fiduciaries, if the fund shrinks, the fiduciary could be “surcharged,” meaning held personally liable for the reduction in the fund due to loss of funds. Loss of funds is not a risk with deposits in banking institutions insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), so long as no more than $250,000 is in any one institution. Many associations spread their reserve funds across multiple banks to keep their funds all insured within the limit. The Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC, www.sipc.org) protects against a stock brokerage becoming insolvent or taking a client’s funds – but it expressly does not protect against declining investments. Associations are often tempted to place...
What Amount of Reserves Does the Law Require?

What Amount of Reserves Does the Law Require?

Dear Kelly, Is there any legal requirement for the reserves to be at any levels or is it a recommendation by the state? Can an HOA be taken over by the state if it is underfunded and if so, at what percentage? Thank you, S.P., Newport Beach Mr. Richardson, Please tell me if there is a Civil Code requiring a certain percentage of funds to be kept in the HOA reserve fund? Also, would you know if there is an average or median level that is known for California HOA’s.? Ours is over 100 percent. J.D., El Cajon Dear S.P. and J.D., The Davis-Stirling Act contains several requirements regarding reserves. Civil Code Section 5550 requires a full study be performed every three years, with annual reviews in-between. Civil 5550(b)(5) requires a long-term funding plan, and Civil 5560 requires that plan include scheduled assessment increases and be adopted in an open board meeting. Civil 5565 requires a detailed written disclosure of the status of each common area component in the reserve study, which disclosure must be in the form prescribed by Civil 5570. This disclosure, per Civil 5300(b)(2) is part of the Annual Budget Report, and so is distributed annually to members and to prospective buyers. Civil 5510(b) requires that reserve funds be spent only on the items they are reserved for, and per Civil 5515 any other withdrawal of reserve funds is considered borrowing which must be disclosed to the members per Civil 5520. The Davis-Stirling Act does not specify any minimum funding of reserve accounts and does not specify a percentage the fund must be in comparison to...
Make a Target! Goals for 2019

Make a Target! Goals for 2019

The late and legendary coach John Wooden said “The most important key to achieving great success is to decide upon your goal and launch, get started, take action, move.” Your association might benefit from setting a few goals, and then moving to achieve them. Here are some ideas for goals in the coming year: Increase the association’s reserve funds by 15%. The closer the association is to a fully funded reserve account, the more financially secure it is. Reduce assessment delinquencies by 20%. Make sure the association has all the Annual Budget Report (Civil 5300) and Annual Policy Statement (Civil 5310) items and annually provides them to owners. Improve member communication and save money by encouraging members to accept communications by email. The law now allows such a consent to be sent by electronic mail. Update the association CC&Rs and bylaws if they are the original documents or are at least 15 years old. Make sure the documents use the current Civil Code references which have been in effect since 2014. Updating the statutory references can be accomplished by board motion (in an open meeting) under Civil 4235. Review and update the rules. Remove rules discriminating against children or which are outdated and no longer enforced. Make sure the HOA has all the legally required rules. Hire an independent consultant to provide a comprehensive assessment of association maintenance and repair needs, to discover any overlooked problems before they become more expensive later. The consultant should NOT be a candidate for the work, so there is no mixed motive in their recommendations. Re-evaluate and update the association web site (or...

Don’t Be Caught Napping: Your Rights At Risk!

Some well-intentioned ideas can boomerang and hurt those who are intended to be helped. Such is the new Civil Code 4041, created by last year’s SB918. Section 4041 appears intended to protect homeowners by requiring annual reminders to keep their mailing addresses current with their associations. It requires each owner to annually notify the HOA of the address(es) and any secondary address for HOA notices, the name of the owner’s legal representative or holder of a power of attorney or someone who can be contacted if the owner is on an “extended absence” from the home, and whether the home is owner occupied or rented. At least thirty days before the Annual Budget Report is sent out each year, the HOA must solicit this information. If the owner does not respond, the HOA must use the home’s address as the address for notices. The greatest trap for unwary homeowners is that last requirement of 4041(c) – the requirement that the HOA, if it receives no update from an owner, must use the property address as the official address for the residence. This would mean that future notices need not be sent to the owner’s off-site address, with potentially disastrous consequences to the off-site owner. The property could be fined or foreclosed without the owner knowing of the problem, because the tenant never forwarded notices to the landlord. Owners who rent their units or who are often away for extended periods of time must be very careful about their annual updates to the HOA. Owners who for many years had a written notification on file with the HOA listing their...